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An Appeal to Bill and Melinda Gates for Help in Raising Healthy Children

Bill Gates recently declared that he and his wife, Melinda, provide remarkably strong phone limits for their own children–much like Steve Jobs provided firm tech rules for his kids. In the Huffington Post, I appeal to Bill and Melinda to use their incredible influence to help America’s parents set screen and phone limits. That’s because Microsoft and other tech companies use powerful strategies to thwart good parents’ efforts to raise healthy kids. 
Read the Huffington Post article here.

 

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The Obamas’ Low-Tech Parenting

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What do the Obamas know about raising kids in a digital age that most American parents don’t? In this Huffington Post article, I highlight the low-tech parenting the President and First Lady have provided their daughters. I also reveal how Malia and Sasha’s top-notch school makes life much easier for parents by encouraging all families in its community to set strong tech limits at home.

Photo credit: Whitehouse.gov
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Childhood is Broken in the Digital Age… Let’s Fix It

Teenage Girl Being Bullied By Text Message

Are we beginning to wake up to the tragic consequences of kids living their lives on devices at the expense of engaging with family, school, and other needed developmental experiences? I believe we are, and I write about it in this Huffington Post article

Photo credit: istockphoto/Highwaystarz-Photography
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Back to Basics: Raising Children in the Digital Age

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Parenting today is as confusing as ever. Remarkably, what matters most to kids are factors that some consider old fashioned. In this Huffington Post article, I describe why it’s time to get back to the basics of raising kids.

Read the article here.

Photo credit: Daxiao Productions/Shutterstock
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The Tragic Story of Child Video Game Addiction

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The mother’s story of her video-game-addicted son in this CNN article and video clip (linked below) is both tragic and compelling. He is much like the children and teens I see in my clinical practice: capable, intelligent kids who are dragged away from an interest in family and school by the lure of gaming.

As described by Iowa State professor Dr. Douglas Gentile in this article and video clip, game addiction is increasingly common, estimated at 8.5% of young gamers. Unfortunately, the substantial risks of this problem are under recognized by parents who often aren’t aware of its impact before purchasing their kids game players, phones, and other devices. The consequences are life-changing for both addicted children and their families. Addicted kids frequently fail school, become depressed, have thoughts of hurting themselves, and can act out violently when parents attempt to set limits.

Treating game-addicted kids is a difficult process for both children and their families, as the addiction hijacks young brains and denies kids the insight to recognize their life is falling apart (“You’re the one with the problem mom!”). The behavior changes in addicted kids are also so profound that it leads many parents to say, “That’s not my child.”

I encourage you to learn more about video game addiction and to take actions to prevent your children or those you care for from developing the problem.

View the CNN article and video here.

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Keep Your Kids Close

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The Huffington Post published Dr. Freed’s article on popular myths that are denying preteens and teens the families they need to live happy, productive lives. The article describes how we can keep our kids close amidst today’s challenges.

Read the Huffington Post article here.

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Dr. Freed Is Interviewed in the New York Times about Pokémon Go

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Interviewed in this New York Times’ article, I raise questions about how the gaming craze of Pokémon Go will affect children. Will it teach kids to appreciate nature, or have them disappointed that there really aren’t game characters hiding behind trees?

Read the Times article here.

Photo Credit: Iakov Filimonov/Shutterstock
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